Content Card – Details, Details, Details

Details and examples are one of those areas that students have struggled with when writing.  Being able to cite details and examples is a skill that is valuable in reading, writing, thinking, and speaking.  What are some of the things we might want to make sure students learn when we ask them to think about details and examples?  We might want them to know what kinds of things are details: facts, quotes, statistics, firgurative language, the information in a visual, sensory details, and more.  We also want students to know some of the things they can do with details:  compare and contrast ideas, support a point of view, oppose a point of view, make a decision, describe a character, make inferences, make prediections, and more.  As always, I’ve got a pdf copy for you – just print it out and share it with your students (and fellow educators).

Content Card, Details

Analysis Questions Building Background Knowledge Checking for Understanding Common Core State Standards - English Language Arts Concept attainment Content Cards curriculum curriculum alignment Curriculum Development Deb Wahlstrom Deborah Wahlstrom Superintendent formative assessment Graphic Organizers Informational Writing instruction Instructional Strategies Language Arts Language Arts - WRITING Literacy in the Disciplines Literacy Standards for Science Literacy Standards for Social Studies Nonfiction Writing Reading to Learn Unpacking Standards Vocabulary Strategies Writing to Learn

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